Part II Projects 2012


Manufacturing single crystal graphene on dedicated substrates

Graphene has shown much promise as a material for next generation electronics due to its unique mechanical and electronic properties. A series of production techniques, including liquid exfoliation, chemical vapour deposition, etc. have been shown to generate different types of graphene. Chemical vapour deposition techniques are of particular interest for the controlled large area growth of graphene and graphene of pre-defined morphologies. However, a fundamental understanding of the graphene substrate interaction crucial for the tailored manufacturing of graphene suitable for industrial applications has yet to be developed. This project will investigate systematically of the reaction parameters in order to optimise graphene growth. It is expected that the findings will be published in peer reviewed journals, conference participation, and collaborative visits to industry are envisaged and will be encouraged.


Fast and facile synthesis towards tailoring functionalities of dedicated nanoparticles

The synthesis of monodisperse nanoparticles of transition metal oxides is of great interest since they display an extensive assortment of structures, properties, and phenomena. A multitude of procedures have been developed for their synthesis, unfortunately most are relatively expensive and time consuming. Recently, new techniques for the precise structural control of these nanoparticles were developed in house [Chem. Commun., 2011, 47, 4108] The aim of this project is to synthesise and characterise a range of transition metal /metal oxide nanoparticles using this fast and inexpensive method. The shape and size of the particles will be systematically varied to determine their effect on functionality. It is expected that the findings will be published in peer reviewed journals, conference participation, and collaborative visits to The Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris are envisaged and will be encouraged.


Novel routes to manufacturing layered inorganic nanomaterials

Cabon nanotubes, have attracted increasingly more attention due to their outstanding properties in recent years. Concurrently, other 1D nanomaterials such as, inorganic nanowires and nanotubes of other layered materials, such as MoS2, WS2, BN, have been explored. Recently, new techniques for the precise structural control of WS2 nanomaterials were developed in house. Larger laboratory scale production, however, is still scarce and needs to be developed in order to make these novel nanomaterials viable for further characterisation, manipulation and application. This project will be focusing on the development of novel routes to inorganic 1D nanomaterials using chemical vapour deposition techniques. In this project the student will work closely with other members of the group and the samples produced by the student will be an integral part of a collaborative project with Dr Michael B Johnston (Department of Physics) and Dr Kylie Vincent (Department of Chemistry). It is envisaged to publish the findings in a peer reviewed journal and conference participation will be encouraged.